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Traditional Publishing vs. Self Publishing

Traditional Publishing vs. Self Publishing

So you're holding a manuscript—maybe complete, maybe not—in your hands, and you're trying to decide between a traditional publishing route and self-publishing your book. You're not alone, and it's not always an easy decision. Let's take a look at some of the pros and cons of traditional publishing as well as that of self-publishing—both options aren't right for everyone, which means finding more out about each might help you confidently make a decision.

Pros and Cons of Traditional Publishing for Your Book

Here are a few things traditional companies offer with professional editing:

·    Editing help: You'll have assistance from a publisher with the editing part of your overall process. This service can be seen as a negative or a positive, but most people appreciate the help.

·    Completion of most publishing work: If you're lucky enough to have a traditional publisher take you on, they'll want the book to succeed. They'll do the professional publishing work for you, which means you won't have to worry about much besides writing your work, pitching it, and getting it accepted. They'll handle cover design, formatting, layout, printing, distribution, cash collection, royalty payments, and more. If it sounds like a lot of work, you're getting a good idea of all the process involves.

·    Marketing assistance: Many factors—some out of your control—will determine how much of your marketing a traditional company does for you, but you can expect it to at least fall between 10 to 50 percent.

The biggest con of working with a traditional publishing house is the amount of time you'll have to put into the process. Arguably, time is significantly more valuable than money. If you choose this route, you'll spend hours upon hours trying to impress people and get accepted as opposed to working on what you love most—writing.

Pros and Cons of Self-Publishing a Book

When you start looking at the pros of self-publishing, you'll notice two primary pros that steer many authors in this direction:

·      Control: It is, without question, a common issue for authors to have to watch editors at publishing houses tear their book up for being too controversial or not aligned with the company's standards. When you self-publish, you'll get to control book appearance, content, design, marketing, and distribution yourself. You won't have to deal with working in a team or having others interfere with your control of the process or final product.

·      Time: While it's definitely not going to happen overnight, self-publishing takes much less time than traditional publishing, which could take years from start to finish.

On the other hand, when you decide to self-publish, you have to make sure you keep yourself on track. In addition, you lose some of the pros that come with traditional publishing. You'll also put a lot more of your own money into self-publishing, whereas a company will pay you. It's up to you to decide whether time or money is more important.

Partner With Edits Made Easy for Your Professional Editing Services

When it comes right down to it, the decision is yours. There's no right or wrong answer here.

If you've decided to self-publish or just want to clean your manuscript up before sending it out to some publishing houses, partner with Edits Made Easy. We'll set you up with a professional editor from among the best. They'll be familiar with your genre and style, and we'll work with your specific goals to make your dream of publication come to life the right way. For help with editing, formatting, layout, citations, and more, contact us right away.

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What to Expect From Self-Publishing

Want to self-publish your book, but feel unsure how? With a few self-publishing tips, you'll be on the right path in no time.

Self-Publishing Explained: The Most Common Ways to Self-Publish

The task of self-publication can be a daunting one if you're not sure about your options, but don't worry! This process is all about your work being in the hands of others. It's something you've dreamed about, so it should be fun. With a little help from self-publishing experts, you'll be on track to starting your own self-publication journey. You might decide it's best for you to work with a service company or a hybrid publisher so that you have more guidance, or you might be thinking you'd rather handle the entire process by yourself.

Many people decide to skip the service company and publishers to move straight for a do-it-yourself approach. We'd be lying to you if we told you that's the easiest method, but there is a good chance it's the most cost-effective. As an individual, you still have access to some of the best online book editing platforms, including the following:

·      Amazon KDP

·      CreateSpace

·      Draft2Digital

·      Smashwords

·      IngramSpark

·      Many more

Common Mistakes to Avoid With Self-Publishing

Self-publishing experts around the world make the truth clear: It's possible to make mistakes during any version of the process. Avoid these common missteps:

·      Having unrealistic expectations: When you set your deadlines and schedules, give yourself breathing room and plan realistically. It's good to have strong aspirations, but you don't want to discourage yourself or set yourself up for failure.

·      Trying to rush the process: Along the same line as the first biggest mistake is to forget that it takes time to self-publish. Sure, it commonly takes less time than traditional publishing, but that doesn't mean you'll go from a blank page to a finished product in a week. Think about what you can accomplish, and plan accordingly.

·      Throwing money at it: There's never any shortage of people in the world who are willing to take your money, but that doesn't mean they're all skilled professionals. Make sure if you recruit anybody for any part of your process—from cover design and proofreading to editing, formatting, and marketing—that they offer reasonable prices that correctly represent the quantity and quality of work they're doing for you.

·      Allowing the details to fall by the wayside: When you finally have your finished book in your hands, you want to feel confident to open the cover and know there won't be errors in formatting, spelling, grammar, punctuation, or any other factors that commonly get overlooked. You need a quality editor throughout the process who specializes in the type of book you're writing.

Make Your Book as Good as It Can Be with Edits Made Easy

If you've decided you're ready to embark on your own journey now that you know what to expect from self-publishing, it's time to consider a professional editing service.

At Edits Made Easy, we have specialized editors who work specifically with novels and other full books and genres to help them reach their fullest potential. We even offer free upgrades in addition to our affordable, professional editing services. Contact us right away to discuss this exciting project!

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7 Ways To Get Your Resume Noticed

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7 Ways To Get Your Resume Noticed

In today’s job-hunting world, it’s no longer enough to have a college degree in your field from an accredited institution—not when more than one-third of Americans (33.4 percent) have four-year college degrees, as reported by the U.S. Census in April 2017. Instead of just relying on a college degree, as might have been the case 20 or even 30 years ago, more and more job seekers are realizing they have to find other ways to make their resumes stand out from the crowd when it comes to appealing to hiring managers, recruiters, and the like.

So what are some good ways to make your resume stand out? There are several different ways to get your resume noticed by recruiters or hiring agencies, but here are some of the most common.

  1. Use a standard resume format. One of the most common mistakes new and even experienced job seekers make when it comes to making their resume stand out is attempting to get creative with the formatting.

While this may work fine for graphic designers, user interface/user experience designers or others in the creative fields, generally you don’t want to get overly fancy with the formatting of your resume. Not only does this play havoc with the applicant-tracking software most companies use, it also makes it more difficult for a recruiter to scan your resume with a casual glance—and sometimes, when they’re going through stacks and stacks of resumes, a casual glance might be all they have time for.

So how can you maintain a little creativity when it comes to your resume, while still staying in that recruiter- and hiring manager-approved standard resume format?

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The answer is to use a template. Many sites offer easy-to-use resume templates, but possibly the most accessible ones are those offered by Google Docs. These templates allow you to present your arguments in a coherent, cogent manner while still managing to make your resume stand out from the crowd—and sometimes, that’s all you need.

  1. Put the most important or relevant things first. When it comes to applying for a job, figure out what sections of your work history are most important, and rank them appropriately. Unless you're a recent graduate, keep your educational background near the bottom. Most employers don't care when you graduated. Instead, they just care that you have a degree.

So look over the job requirements, figure out what jobs would be most relevant to the job you’re applying for, and put those first. Say you’re applying for a graphic design position in San Diego: That year you spent working as a cashier at the local Walmart probably isn’t relevant, so it would be wise to either keep it down to the bottom of your resume, or leave it off entirely.

What do you do if your most relevant experience isn’t your most recent experience? At that point, your best bet is to create a tailored “Experience” section that comes before everything else. This portion should have every job, volunteer work or other experience you think a recruiter or hiring manager would want to see for the position in question. The key with this section is to ensure the person reading your resume gets the message about what you have to offer.

  1. Tailor your resume to the position you’re applying for. When it comes to ways to get your resume noticed by hiring managers, or even just their website’s applicant-tracking software, you should tailor your resume to the position for which you’re applying to . We touched on this a little in the previous section with the use of a “Relevant Experience” section, but you can even take that one step further.

If you’re planning to apply for multiple, similar positions, one easy way to tailor your resume is through the use of keyword analysis and insertion. Take all the job postings you’re interested in applying for and run them through a keyword analysis website like SEObook’s Keyword Density Analyzer. This tool will show you what keywords come up most often in all the job postings you’re looking at, and then ranks them by frequency.

You can use this keyword analysis to adapt sections of your resume to include keywords managers or applicant-tracking software are looking for. For example, if you’re looking for front-end web developer positions and the keyword analysis software mentions HTML 65% of the time, it would be best to include your HTML experience in each of the jobs you performed, or even just in a “Relevant Skills” section.

The more times you use specific, well-used keywords, the more the applicant-tracking software will ping on your resume, increasing its visibility.

  1. Add and update a “Relevant Skills” section. Right underneath the “Relevant Experience” section of your resume, consider adding a “Relevant Skills” section if you don’t already have one. This is a way to bring attention to skills relevant to your new position, which you developed or trained yourself in at a previous job. To come back to that example of the graphic design position in San Diego, if you had taught yourself how to use the Adobe Creative Suite of design and production programs, that would be something to add to a “Relevant Skills” section.   

Using a “Relevant Skills”  section is one of the easy ways to make your resume stand out to hiring managers, because it allows you to showcase skills that may not be explicitly obvious in your “Relevant Experience” section. In fact, it’s best to put your “Relevant Skills”  section right underneath your “Relevant Experience” so it’s the next thing the hiring manager sees when looking at your resume.

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At the same time, however, be sure to keep that “Relevant Skills” section updated. Remove anything you know a hiring manager will think is a little dated—for example, experience in Microsoft Office Suite. In a post-college world, no hiring manager needs to hear you have experience in programs like that—it’s expected. Instead, use this section for skills that would be unexpected or would make you stand out from the crowd, like a foreign language.

  1. Don’t neglect the basics. As you get your resume prepared for the position or positions you’re applying for, don’t forget to keep the basics in mind. That means double-checking your formatting before you hit that “submit” button, making sure it’s consistent across all areas of your resume. You want all the headers in the same font and style, all the bullet points to match up—both in point type and in font selection—and all the numerals, numbers, and dates to look the same across the board.

The main thing to remember is that you do not want your resume’s styling to look sloppy—good formatting is one of the many ways you can set your resume apart from others’.

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Part of not neglecting the basics also means you need to watch out for acronyms, making sure that you spell them out and include the acronym on first usage so the recruiter can understand exactly what you’re talking about. Don’t assume someone in human resources is familiar with all the jargon and technical terms common in the design industry.

Spelling out all acronyms also means the applicant tracking software most hiring managers use will be able to pick up on the acronym in either format, ensuring it doesn’t discount you as not having experience that you do, in fact, have. An example of this would be listing yourself as a Certified Public Accountant, or CPA.

  1. Mind the gaps. When it comes to gaps in your work history, how you handle them might be what sets your resume apart from the others. The best way to do this is to cut out the usual start and end dates of a position—e.g. dd/mm/yyyy to dd/mm/yyyy—and instead go with just the years only. So if you worked as a graphic designer with the Martin Fields Design Company from 6/06/2010 to 8/18/2014, consider just changing those dates to 6/2010 and 8/2014, respectively.

If you ever have to explain gaps in your resume, there are some things you can do to best address them, if employers should ask.

 Be honest. Whether it’s a layoff, a firing, or just a simple need to take time off work to tackle other things, employers will be thankful for your honesty when it comes to what you may have been doing in your absence from the workforce. Developing a reputation for being truthful—or, on the opposite side, deceitful—will last a lifetime and impact how your future job interviews go, whether you realize it or not.

 Be prepared. Even as you prepare to discuss previous positions you’ve held or skills you’ve learned, prepare for questions from your possible employer about the gaps in your work history. Stuttering and stammering your way through these explanations is just as unimpressive as showing up late or forgetting copies of your resume. Being prepared to talk about resume gaps isn’t just about focusing on what can negatively affect you, but also about the positive effects. Consider the important skills you’ve picked up along the way as you’ve taken a break from the workforce, and how you can use them to reinforce the job you’re going for.

7.    Identify a narrative and stick to it. Identifying and sticking to a narrative is one of the best ways to   get your resume noticed by a hiring manager. Figure out what the overarching aim of your resume is. What kind of job are you attempting to get hired for? Does your relevant experience point toward you  being a good fit for this job? Do your relevant skills match skills people in this job category are known     to have? Roll these questions around in your head as you look your resume over.

      Once you’re certain that your resume has developed and sticks to the storyline you want to present, print it out and pass it off to a trusted friend to read. Ask them what they think the narrative is. What are their three most notable takeaways after reading your resume? If these don’t match up with the vibe you’re looking to put out, it’s time to go back to the drawing board.

      After you’re certain you’ve established a narrative for your resume, don’t forget to carry it over to your cover letter. While not all jobs require a cover letter, many do, and being able to write one that touts why   you’re a strong match and why you’d be a good fit in the job you’re applying for is a good way to get   hiring managers to take a look at your resume. Use this as an opportunity to do research on the role, as      well.

While these tips are great for getting your resume noticed by a hiring manager or recruiter, you shouldn’t just neglect the job once you’ve hit that “submit” button.

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If you feel comfortable doing so, ask the hiring manager or recruiter for advice on how they’d like you to follow up. Follow it. If no advice is forthcoming, at the very least you can follow up with a call or email to the person responsible for filling the position. Be ready to reiterate your interest in the position, because you might only have a few minutes to sell yourself. Practice before you pick up the phone. Write up a draft or two before you send that email. Above all, just find the right balance so you stay on top of the recruiter’s mind and one step closer to getting that job.

Trust Edits Made Easy For All Your Editing Needs

Since its founding in 2008, Edits Made Easy has helped countless job seekers to get hired by equipping them with the resumes and cover letters that made them stand out from the crowd. Edits Made Easy can edit the resume and cover letter you’ve written, or our team can create an entirely new set of professionally written documents for you.

Edits Made Easy doesn’t use templates in creating your resume and cover letter. Instead, a career specialist from our team will conduct a live phone interview with you to make sure that we thoroughly understand your background, as well as the job for which you are applying. Then we’ll create a resume and cover letter intended to highlight what about you makes you specifically suited for this job.

Packages start at just $95. Add-on services for specialized formatting and interview coaching are also available.

Edits Made Easy offers a wide variety of academic, business, personal, and author-centric services, including:

  • Proofreading
  • Developmental editing
  • English-as-a-Second-Language editing
  • Manuscript editing
  • Formatting and design
  • Transcription
  • Author coaching

Our full suite of business editing services includes editing for business plans, proposals, presentations, marketing materials, contracts, blogs, newsletters, policy manuals, and, of course, resumes and CVs. If you’re interested in any of our many services, or just looking to give your resume/CV some polish before sending it off to the job of your dreams, feel free to contact us via our website.

 

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It's National Novel Writing Month!

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It's National Novel Writing Month!

It's November 1, and that means it's National Novel Writing Month! Follow EME administrator Lou Hyde as he joins a half-million writers across the country and throughout the world in producing a first draft of his first novel in the next 30 days--and let him encourage you to do the same!

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Affect and Effect

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Affect and Effect

One set of homonyms that causes many writers trouble is AFFECT and EFFECT. They key to remembering the distinction is that, MOST of the time, ‘affect’ is an action. Get that? ‘A’ for ‘action’ and A for ‘affect’—pretty clever, no? Meanwhile ‘effect’ is a result, or a noun. 

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TEN QUESTIONS YOU SHOULD ASK BEFORE HIRING AN EDITOR

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TEN QUESTIONS YOU SHOULD ASK BEFORE HIRING AN EDITOR

Ten questions may seem like a lot. But you've worked hard on your manuscript, and if it's a complete dissertation or thesis, novel or memoir, you're probably going to spend in excess of $1,000 to have it edited. You need to know that it's going to be money well spent, and that you're entrusting your precious work to someone who has the ability to give it the quality treatment it deserves. The following ten questions will help ensure you're in the right hands—so don't be shy about asking them!

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Navigating the World of Online Editors

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Navigating the World of Online Editors

How do you choose the right editor? If you are preparing to navigate the world of online editors, perhaps it would help to see them as fitting into one of three main categories: aggregators, independents, and teams. In brief, aggregators are companies that aggregate a number of freelance editors in one website, but with little supervision or coordination of efforts; independents are freelance editors who operate completely on their own; and teams are companies that utilize the services of multiple editors, but with supervision, review of their work, and coordination of their efforts. For some of the key pros and cons of working with each of these groups, read on.

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Should I Hire an Indexer?

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Should I Hire an Indexer?

If you’re writing nonfiction, and especially if you’re writing an academic book of some sort, an index is usually a must. Beyond the sheer dollars and cents value of helping book buyers to see that your book has what they need, you wrote the book because you thought it would be useful to people. And when it comes to your book’s usefulness, a good index can make all the difference in whether or not a reader is able to find the information s/he really needs. A really good index analyzes words and concepts, and it shows the connections between them, all while distinguishing substantive discussions of those concepts from merely passing mentions. In short, indexing is a work that requires analysis, judgment, and creativity—which is why it can’t be done by a computer.

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Dissertation Editing: Is It Ethical?

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Dissertation Editing: Is It Ethical?

While, as a rule, it is always considered unethical for professional editors to directly carry out research on behalf of the student or to make direct changes to the content or structure of a thesis, dissertation, or any paper being submitted for a grade, there are at least three key areas where professional editing may make important contributions to the thesis or dissertation writing process and remain entirely within the bounds of academic integrity. The end result will be your own research and ideas presented in the clearest and most effective way possible--and that's a recipe for academic success!

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Tools of the Trade: How Editors Find Writers

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Tools of the Trade: How Editors Find Writers

Take the current economy, add the downsizing of many publishing houses, the need for manuscripts and writers, the hand-tied agents who can’t afford to take on new clients, and the abundance of writers since the advent of the computer. Shake and toss on the table and one solution will surface: Writers who are serious about being published will take matters into their own hands. They will self-publish, write blogs or e-zines, have a website dedicated to their topic, and be active on Facebook and Twitter. Let the team of professional editors and coaches at Edits Made Easy help you to get your manuscript and query into the best possible shape, and to guide you in staking your claim in the world of publishing.

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Bias in the Thesis

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Bias in the Thesis

We can never divorce ourselves from the perspectives we bring to our work, of course, but those perspectives don’t have to determine the outcome of our research; if an academic is going to make any kind of real contribution to thought, his or her work has to be free of bias.

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Getting Away With Plagiarism: A Thing of the Past

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Getting Away With Plagiarism: A Thing of the Past

After years as a professional editor, following upon nearly two decades as a college professor, I’m astounded by the number of papers I’ve read that have involved plagiarism—even at the doctoral level, where the stakes are extremely high. I like to think that most of it is unintentional. That, in itself, is rather unnerving, however, since it means that you can fall into this trap, too! If your intention is to pass off someone’s work as your own, there’s no advice I can give other than, “Proceed at your own risk, and be prepared for the consequences; any professor who cares to catch you probably will.” If your intention is to avoid plagiarism of the unintentional variety, however, here are a few tips that might help.

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One Month, One Novel

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One Month, One Novel

A week into National Novel Writing Month, it's a good time to think about what you are trying to accomplish this month--not a final, publishable work, but a worthy first draft. And in the process of taking that first draft to a better second draft and an amazing third draft, consider enlisting the support of the coaches and editors at Edits Made Easy, who will give you just the feedback you need to turn your manuscript into a published book.

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How to Identify Your Ideal Reader

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How to Identify Your Ideal Reader

Have you identified your ideal reader? Keep in mind that this exercise will not only make your memoir more attractive to a potential publisher, it will help you focus your writing and dig more deeply into the significance of your message. If you have difficulty grasping the concept of this stage of writing, a professional editor, like those you find on the team at Edits Made Easy, can easily guide you through the process.

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What's New in APA-6? Headings

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What's New in APA-6? Headings

If you’ve been working in APA-5 and now must switch to using APA-6, certainly one of the most obvious changes will be the formatting of headers. Both editions of the APA Manual of Style provide for up to five levels of headings and subheadings, and both direct that numbers and letters should not be used. But the details of each of those levels have changed. The academic editors and coaches at Edits Made Easy can help you to navigate these changes with each and guarantee that your thesis or dissertation is in full compliance with the latest version of APA style. 

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What's New in APA-6? One Space or Two?

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What's New in APA-6? One Space or Two?

If you're used to working in APA-5 and now must switch to APA-6, one of the notable differences is the number of spaces that follow final punctuation (periods, question marks, exclamation points) in sentences. Reverting to an earlier practice, and setting itself apart from Chicago, Turabian, MLA, and many other style sheets, the newest version of the APA Publication Manual specifies the use of two character spaces between sentences in draft documents. If you're having trouble with the formatting of your thesis or dissertation, the team of editors and coaches at Edits Made Easy can help ensure that your work is in full compliance with current APA standards.

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The 5 Questions to Ask Before You Seek an Agent

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The 5 Questions to Ask Before You Seek an Agent

Remember that the working relationship between an agent and an author is a very close, very involved one. You will be corresponding with them via email and phone a lot. You will go back and forth with your manuscript and receive a lot of consultation. You need someone that you are able to work with to a great extent on a professional level. In this post, Gordon discusses some of the fundamental questions you should ask as you look for an agent. And as always, the team of professional editors and coaches at Edits Made Easy stand ready to help you to write your query letter and synopsis, and to edit your manuscript so it is in the best possible form when you finally send it off.

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How to Find an Agent

Finding the right agent and then submitting just what he or she is looking for requires some advance prep work on the part of an author. In this article, EME editor/coach Gordon, who is also an agent for memoirs, offers some tips on identifying the right agent for your book and then approaching that agent in just the right way. And as always, the whole team of editors and coaches at Edits Made Easy stand ready to assist you in preparing your query letter and synopsis, and in editing your book manuscript so it is in the best possible shape before you send it out.

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Why Write Short Fiction?

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Why Write Short Fiction?

I go to a lot of conferences and talk to a lot of writers, and one of the most common things that these aspiring novelists don’t take advantage of is writing in the short form. “But I write novels. Why should I write short stories?” It’s a fair question, and I wouldn’t recommend writing shorts unless it helps you find success with your novel. It does, both from a technical and a business standpoint. Read on, Grasshopper.

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